logo house of francheska international sellers specializing in antique, vintage and estate jewellery, top ten business for the south west region barclays trading places awards 2008



Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor DBE

latest news for website

Elizabeth Taylor for AVON Jewellery Collection Started November 1993 to 1996

House of Taylor Jewellery, June 2005 - Ceased Trading

Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor born in 1932 in Hempstead, England is best know as a movie actress and her sales of fragrances White Diamonds perfumes cosmetics, gaming and publishing through the years. She was said to be the 11th Greatest Movie Star of her time by Entertainment Weekly and the 40th Greatest Movie Star of all times by Premiere Magazine. She has owned some of the worlds most magnificent jewellery including The Krupp Diamond and The La Peregina Pearl

In November 1993, Elizabeth Taylor collaborated with Avon Products Inc. on a collection of fashion jewellery signed and designed by her and carrying her name. The initial costume jewellery lines would consist of five collections with prices ranging from $40 and the lines will be sold directly to the consumer by Avon representatives nationwide going door to door or scheduling house parties using the companys direct-mail catalogue. The company did not make their own jewellery but other firms like Krementz manufactured and designed their product lines. Mark Elizabeth Taylor with a Script "E", and Avon embedded in a plaque on the back of the base metal piece of jewellery. Her collection consisted of necklaces, bracelets, earrings, brooches and rings with themes, Egyptian Collection sets, Shah Jehan sets, Elephant Walk sets, Eternal Flame sets, Midnight Romance sets, Passion Flower Sets, Radiant, Brilliance, Gilded Age and Sparkle Kiss rings and earrings, Katherina Cross sets, Hearts in Tandem sets, Sparkle Earrings, Signature Gold Coast sets, Sea Coral sets and Zebra sets to name a few. The early pieces are now very collectable and sought after.

Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor DBE (born February 27, 1932) is an iconic two-time Academy Award-winning actress. She was long considered one of the most beautiful women in the world and, arguably, the most beautiful American actress of all time. Her trademark is her dazzling violet-blue eyes. Many consider her the last icon of Hollywood's golden era.

Early life and career
She was born in Hampstead, London, the second child of Francis Lenn Taylor (December 28, 1897 to November 20, 1968) and Sara Viola Warmbrodt (August 21, 1896 to September 11, 1994), who were Americans residing in Britain. Her older brother is Howard Taylor (born in 1929).

Though sometimes referred to as "Liz," she is not fond of that name and prefers her given name to be pronounced Eee--lizabeth. Her first names are in honor of her paternal grandmother, Elizabeth Taylor, who was born Elizabeth Mary Rosemond.

Taylor was born with U.S. nationality. Both of her American parents were originally from Arkansas City, Kansas. Her father was an art dealer and her mother a former actress whose stage name was Sara Sothern. Sara retired from the stage when she and Francis Taylor married in 1926 in New York.

At the age of 3, Elizabeth began taking ballet lessons. After the UK entered World War II, her parents decided to return to the United States to avoid hostilities. Her mother took the children first, while her father remained in London to wrap up matters in the art business. They settled in Los Angeles, California, where Sara's family, the Warmbrodts, were then living.

Taylor appeared in her first motion picture at the age of 9 for Universal. They let her contract drop, and she was signed with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Her first movie with that studio was Lassie Come Home (1943), which drew favorable attention. After a couple more movies, the second on loan'out to 20th Century Fox, she appeared in her first leading role and achieved child star status playing Velvet Brown, a young girl who trains a horse to win the Grand National in Clarence Brown's movie National Velvet (1944) with Mickey Rooney. National Velvet was a big hit, grossing over $4,000,000 at the box-office, and she was signed to a long-term contract.

She attended school on the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer lot and received a diploma from University High School in Los Angeles on January 26, 1950, the same year she was first married at age 18.

Mature career and marriages
Elizabeth Taylor won the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her performances in Butterfield 8 (1960), which co-starred then husband Eddie Fisher, and again for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), which co-starred then-husband Richard Burton and the Supporting Actress Oscar-winner, Sandy Dennis.

Taylor was nominated for Raintree County (1957) opposite Montgomery Clift, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) opposite Paul Newman, and Suddenly, Last Summer (1959) with Clift, Katharine Hepburn and Mercedes McCambridge.

In 1963, she became the highest paid movie star up until that time when she accepted $1,000,000 to play the title role in the lavish production of Cleopatra for 20th Century Fox. And it was during the filming of that movie that she worked for the first time with future husband Richard Burton, who played Mark Antony. Movie magazines, the forerunners of today's tabloids, had a field day when Taylor and Burton began an affair during filming; both stars were married to other people at the time. In a romantic entanglement that had tongues wagging on every continent, Taylor would trade in husband Eddie Fisher for Burton not long after Fisher had unceremoniously ditched wife Debbie Reynolds for Taylor. Years later, Burton would slyly refer to the whole mess as "la scandale". The episode cemented Taylor's reputation as a dark, hypnotic femme fatale (who was condemned by the Vatican), boosted Reynolds' career as a blonde, all-American sweetheart, and elevated Burton to the front ranks of film stars. Only Fisher did not really profit from the cascade of free publicity.

Elizabeth has been married eight times to seven husbands:
Hotel heir Conrad Hilton, Jr May 6, 1950 - (January 29, 1951) (divorced)
Michael Wilding (February 21, 1952 - January 26, 1957) (divorced)
Producer Mike Todd (February 2, 1957 - March 22, 1958) (Widowed)
Eddie Fisher (May 12, 1959 - March 6, 1964) (divorced)
Richard Burton (March 15, 1964 - June 26, 1974) (divorced)
Richard Burton (2nd marriage) (October 10, 1975 - July 29, 1976) (divorced)
Senator John Warner (December 4, 1976 - November 7, 1982) (divorced)
Teamster construction-equipment operator Larry Fortensky (twenty years her junior) (October 6, 1991 - October 31, 1996) (divorced)

Taylor and Wilding had two sons, Michael Howard Wilding (born January 6, 1953), and Christopher Edward Wilding (born February 27, 1955). She and Todd had one daughter, Elizabeth Frances Todd, called "Liza," (born August 6, 1957). And in 1964, she and Fisher started adoption proceedings for a daughter, whom Burton later adopted, Maria Burton (born August 1, 1961). During her marriage to Fisher, Taylor converted to Judaism (having been born into the Christian Science faith). She remains Jewish to this day, having referred to herself as such several times.

Elizabeth has also appeared a number of times on television, including the 1973 made-for-TV movie with then husband Richard Burton, titled Divorce His - Divorce Hers. In 1985, she played movie gossip columnist Louella Parsons in Malice in Wonderland opposite Jane Alexander, who played Hedda Hopper, and also appeared in the mini-series North and South. In 2001, she played an agent in These Old Broads. She has also appeared on a number of other TV shows, including the soap operas General Hospital and All My Children and the animated The Simpsons (as the voice of Maggie).

Taylor has also acted on the stage, making her Broadway and West End debuts in 1982 with a revival of Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes. She was then in a production of Noel Coward's Private Lives (1983), in which she starred with her former husband, Richard Burton.

After marrying Richard Burton, Taylor relinquished her American citizenship and is now a "permanent resident" of the U.S. After marrying Republican Senator John Warner of Virginia, she received a "green card" and keeps her British passport.

Other interests
Taylor has a passion for jewelry. Over the years she has owned a number of well known pieces, two of the most talked about being the 33.19 carat (6.638 g) Krupp Diamond and the 69.42 carat (13.884 g) pear shaped Taylor-Burton Diamond, which were among many dazzling gifts from husband Richard Burton. Her enduring collection of jewelry has been eternalized with her book My Love Affair with Jewelry (2002-. In 2005, she partnered with Jack and Monty Abramov of Mirabelle Luxury Concepts in Los Angeles to introduce the House of Taylor Jewelry. She has also launched three perfumes, "Passion," "White Diamonds," and "Black Pearls," that together earn an estimated $200,000,000 in annual sales.

Taylor has devoted much time and energy to AIDS-related charities and fundraising. She helped start the [1[ American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) after the death of her former co-star and friend, Rock Hudson. She also created her own AIDS foundation. By 1999, she had helped to raise an estimated $50,000,000 (USD) to fight the disease.

In the early 1980s she moved to Bel-Air, Los Angeles, California, which is her current home. The fenced and gated property is on tour maps sold at street corners and is frequently passed by tour guides.

In 1988, a bill passed the U.S. Congress expressly for the purpose of blocking deportation of Taylor's son Michael, who had renounced his American citizenship in 1971 for past possession of marijuana. This of course doesn't compare to his mother's legendary taste for hydrocodone.

Awards and Honours
Dame Elizabeth Taylor has won two Academy Awards for Best Actress. She won the first in 1961 for Butterfield 8 and the second in 1967 for Mike Nichols' drama Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf, which many consider to be her best performance in a film.

Taylor received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1992 from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The following year, 1993, she received the AFI Life Achievement Award. And in 2002, she was a Kennedy Center Honoree.

In 1999, she was awarded a Dame Commander of the British Empire (DBE) by Queen Elizabeth II. Though she was thrilled with this honor, Taylor cracked, "I've always been a broad, now I'm a dame."

In 2001, U.S. President Bill Clinton awarded her the Presidential Citizens Medal in recognition of her commitment to philanthropy. It is the second-highest civilian honor in the United States, awarded to U.S. citizens "who have performed exemplary deeds or services" for their country or fellow citizens.

Elizabeth Taylor's hand and foot prints are immortalized in the forecourt of Grauman's Chinese Theater and she has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6336 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California.

On November 10, 2005, Taylor received the Britannia Award for Artistic Excellence in International Entertainment.

Recent years
In November 2004, Taylor announced that she had been diagnosed with congestive heart failure, a terminal condition in which the heart pumps insufficient amounts of blood throughout the body. She has broken her back five times, has survived a benign brain tumor operation, skin cancer, and has faced life-threatening bouts with pneumonia twice. She is reclusive and sometimes fails to make scheduled appearances due to illness or other personal reasons. She is now apparently confined to a wheelchair to get around.

In 2005 she was a vocal supporter of her best friend, Michael Jackson, in his trial in California on charges of sexually abusing a child. He was ultimately acquitted.

In recent years, Taylor has reportedly become closely attached to her pet dog, saying that she goes nowhere without her little Maltese named Sugar. In an interview with American magazine W, Taylor said she was happiest while with husbands Todd and Burton, but now has to be content with Sugar for company. She explains, "I've never loved a dog like this in my life. It's amazing. Sometimes I think there's a person in there. There's something to say for this kind of love - it's unconditional." In June 2005, Taylor's beloved dog Sugar died. However, several months later (in September( she purchased a descendant of Sugar which she named Daisy.

Elizabeth Taylor is reportedly in seclusion due to ill health, and is said to have made plans for her ashes to be scattered in Wales (the homeland of her two-time husband, the late actor Richard Burton) after her death and cremation.

Elizabeths Starlet Years
A family friend noticed the strikingly beautiful little Elizabeth and suggested that she be taken for a screen test. Her test impressed executives at Universal Picturs enough to sign her to a contract. Her first foray onto the screen was in There's One Born Every Minute (1942), released when she was ten. Universal dropped her contract after that one film, but Elizabeth was soon picked up by MGM. The first production she made with that studio was Lassie Come Home (1943), and on the strength of that one film, MGM signed her for a full year. She had minuscule parts in her next two films, The White Cliffs of Dover (1944) and Jane Eyre (1944) (the former made while she was on loan to 20th Century-Fox). Then came the picture that made Elizabeth a star: MGM's National Velvet (1944). She played Velvet Brown opposite Mickey Rooney . The film was a smash hit, grossing over $4 million. Elizabeth now had a long-term contract with MGM and was its top child star. She made no films in 1945, but returned in 1946 in Courage of Lassie (1946).

In 1947, when she was 15, she starred in Life with Father (1947) with such heavyweights as William Powell , Irene Dunne and Zasu Pitts . Throughout the rest of the 1940s and into the early 1950s Elizabeth appeared in film after film with mostly good results. Her busiest year was 1954, with roles in Rhapsody (1954), Beau Brummell (1954), The Last Time I Saw Paris (1954) and Elephant Walk (1954). She was 22 now, and even at that young age was considered one of the world's great beauties. In 1955 she appeared in the hit Giant (1956) with James Dean. Sadly, Dean never saw the release of the film, as he died in a car accident in 1955. The next year saw Elizabeth star in Raintree County (1957), an overblown epic made, partially, in Kentucky. Critics called it dry as dust. Despite the film's shortcomings, Elizabeth was nominated for an Academy Award for her portrayal of Southern belle Susanna Drake. However, on Oscar night the honor went to Joanne Woodward for The Three Faces of Eve (1957). In 1958 Elizabeth starred as Maggie Pollitt in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958). The film received rave reviews from the critics and Elizabeth was nominated again for an Academy Award for best actress, but this time she lost to Susan Hayward in I Want to Live! (1958). She was still a hot commodity in the film world, though. In 1959 she appeared in another mega-hit and received yet another Oscar nomination for Suddenly, Last Summer (1959). Once again, however, she lost out, this time to Simone Signoret for Room at the Top (1959). Her Oscar drought ended in 1960 when she brought home the coveted statue for her flawless performance in Butterfield 8 (1960) as Gloria Wandrous, a call girl who is involved with a married man and later dies in an auto accident. Some critics blasted the movie but they couldn't ignore her performance. There were no more films for Elizabeth for three years. She left MGM after her contract ran out, but would do projects for the studio later down the road.

In 1963 she starred in Cleopatra (1963), which was one of the most expensive productions up to that time as was her salary, a whopping $$1,000,000. This was the film where she met her future and fifth husband, Richard Burton (the previous four were Conrad Hilton, Michael Wilding , Michael Todd who died in a plane crash and Eddie Fisher). Her next handful of films were lackluster at best, especially 1963's The V.I.P.s (1963), which was shredded by most critics. Elizabeth was to return to fine form, however, with the role of Martha in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966). Her performance as the loudmouthed, shrewish, unkempt Martha was easily her finest to date. For this she would win her second Oscar and one that was more than well-deserved, but her films afterward didn't approach the intensity of that one. Since then she has appeared in several movies, both theatrical and made-for-television, and a number of TV programs. In February 1997 Elizabeth entered the hospital for the removal of a brain tumor. The operation was successful.

As for her private life, she divorced Burton in 1974, only to remarry him in 1975 and divorce him, permanently, in 1976. She has had two husbands since, Senator John Warner and Larry Fortensky.

Probably more frequently remembered for his turbulent personal life and multiple marriages, however Richard Burton was truly one of the great UK actors of the post WW2 period. The young Richard Jenkins was the son of a Welsh coal miner, and he received a scholarship to Oxford University to study acting and made his first stage appearance in the early 1940s. His first film appearances were in non-descript movies such as Last Days Of Dolwyn, The (1949), Waterfront (1950) and Green Grow the Rushes (1950). Then he started to get noticed by producers and audiences with his lead in My Cousin Rachel (1952) Robe, The (1953) and Alexander The Great (1956), added to this he was also spending considerable time in stage productions, both in the UK and USA, often to splendid reviews. The late 1950s was an exciting & inventive time in UK cinema, often referred to as the "British New Wave", and Burton was right in the thick of things, and showcased a sensational performance in Look Back In Anger (1959). He also appeared with a cavalcade of international stars in the WW2 magnum opus The Longest Day (1962), and then onto arguably his most "notorious" role as that of "Marc Antony" opposite Elizabeth Taylor in the hugely expensive Cleopatra (1963). This was, of course, the film that kick started their fiery and passionate romance (plus two marriages), and the two of them appeared in several productions over the next few years including V.I.P.s, The (1963), The Sandpiper (1965), the dynamic Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf (1966) and The Taming of the Shrew (1967). However, Burton was often better when he was off on his own giving higher caliber performances, such as those in Becket (1964), the brilliant thriller The Spy Who Came In from the Cold (1965) and alongside Clint Eastwood in the actioner Where Eagles Dare (1968).

His audience appeal began to decline somewhat during the early 1970s as fans turned to younger, more virile male stars, however Burton was superb in Anne of the Thousand Days (1969), he put on a reasonable show in Raid on Rommel (1971), was over the top in Bluebeard (1972), and wildly miscast in the ludicrous The Assassination of Trotsky (1972). By 1975, quality male lead roles were definitely going to other stars, and Burton found himself appearing in some movies of dubious quality, just to pay the bills, including The Klansman (1974), Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977) and The Medusa Touch (1978). However in 1978, he appeared with fellow UK acting icons Richard Harris and Roger Moore in The Wild Geese (1978) about mercenaries in South Africa, and whilst the film had a modest initial run, over the past twenty five years it has picked up quite a cult following! His two last great performances were as the sinister "O'Brien" in Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984), and in the TV mini series "Ellis Island" (1984) He passed away on August 5th, 1984 in Celigny, Switzerland from a cerebral hemorrhage.

Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor DBE
Born: (27 February 1932) Died: (23 March 2011)
My sincere condolences to Elizabeth's family,
Although I never got to meet Elizabeth in person I always felt she was near, she'll be sorely missed and was loved by many people all around the world.
Thank you Elizabeth for being you and for sharing your fabulous jewels.
Rest in Peace

purple Rose

Dame Elizabeth Taylor DBE dies at the age of 79 > > >

Dame Elizabeth Taylor Biography > > >

Dame Elizabeth Taylor Quits Jewellery Company > > >

Wheelchair-bound Dame Elizabeth Taylor stuns in pink to help California celebrate gay marriage legislation. > > >


liz banner  liz banner  liz banner  liz banner  liz banner  liz banner


Elizabeth Taylor For Avon Costume Jewellery

elizabeth taylor wearing the jewelry elizabeth taylor for avon jewelry range

Elizabeth Taylor for Avon Costume Jewellery
The Fabulous Elizabeth Taylor for Avon Costume Jewellery
The Full Collection Dated 1993 - 1996


Brilliance | Crystal Rose | Eternal Flame | Elephant Walk | Evening Star | Egyptian Style | Forever Violet | Goldcoast Guilded Age | Heart of Hollywood | Hearts in Tandem | Jhaveri | Katherina Cross | Love Bloom | Midnight Romance | Passion Flower | Radiance | Sea Shimmer Sea Coral | Shah Jehan | Sparkle Kiss | Taylored Style | Treasured Vine | White Diamonds | Zebra Stripe

Please view the entire Elizabeth Taylor for Avon Jewellery full collection >>>

Abstract taken with Courtesy from Elizabeths wonderful Book
My Love Affair with Jewelry - By Elizabeth Taylor

My love affair with jewelry - by Elizabeth Taylor

I have felt that ever since Richard started giving me jewelry, there was some meaning in it for him, too. He would do it with such a twinkle and with such glee. He would say I know I could give a $10 ornament for your hair or a $10,000 Van Cleef & Arpels necklace to wear around your neck and in your eyes I would see the same appreciation. I just love to watch your response and thats why I love giving you jewelry.

To view more items in the shop please visit the link below:
www.house-of-francheska.co.uk/vintage-antique-catalog-listing.htm


To view customer information please click on the link below:
www.house-of-francheska.co.uk/information.htm


To view the sold gallery for reference and identification please click on the link below:
www.house-of-francheska.co.uk/sold-gallery-reference-identification-pg2.htm


romancart


cheque bank transfer postal order


facebook twitter pinterest linkedin google


Back to top of page

copyright